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“History cannot be interpreted without the aid of imagination and intuition. The sheer quantity of evidence is so overwhelming that selection is inevitable. Where there is selection there is art.”

— repeating themes

… in March 2009 and realized that a few companies you did not own had fallen by 80-90% in the previous fifteen months … When you woke up in June 2018, Unitech was down another 85% from your buying prices, and Suzlon and Jaiprakash Associates were down another 85% and 70% respectively.

high quality vs low price

Most of our attention goes to things that are huge, profitable, famous, or influential. And when most of what you pay attention to is the result of a tail, you underestimate how rare and powerful they really are.

The S&P 500 gained 108% over the last five years. Twenty-two companies are responsible for half that gain.

Charlie Munger followed up: “If you remove just a few of Berkshire’s top investments, its long-term track record is pretty average.”

tails you win

“Perfection is finally attained not when there is no longer anything to add, but when there is no longer anything to take away.”

succeed at work

Having rules actually protects us. Imagine you invited me to do something and I said, “I’m sorry. I have a rule. I don’t give more than 10 talks a year, or I don’t do X, or Y, or Z.” You would not feel good saying, “Oh, would you please break your rules once for me?”

If you said, for example, “I’m going to eat dessert on only one out of every four days,” odds are that you would cheat yourself. You will end up eating more dessert that you wanted. But if you have the rule that says, “I never eat dessert,” or, “I only eat dessert on Saturday,” that would be easier for you to keep.

rules vs habits

You’ve got a complex system and it spews out a lot of wonderful numbers that enable you to measure some factors. But there are other factors that are terribly important, [yet] there’s no precise numbering you can put to these factors. You know they’re important, but you don’t have the numbers. Well, practically (1) everybody overweighs the stuff that can be numbered, because it yields to the statistical techniques they’re taught in academia, and (2) doesn’t mix in the hard-to-measure stuff that may be more important. That is a mistake I’ve tried all my life to avoid, and I have no regrets for having done that.

pursuit of worldly wisdom by Charlie Munger

 

 

 

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