Restaurant Group (LON:RTN)

The Restaurant Group operates over 500 restaurants and pub restaurants. Its principal trading brands are Frankie & Benny’s, Chiquito and Coast to Coast. The Group also operates Pub restaurants and a Concessions business which trades principally at UK airports.

It does approximately £600M of revenue and £128M of EBITDA. At the current prices of £3.45/share, the company is selling for £712M and has very low debt (new £38M). Depreciation is ~ £40M.

Red flags: New CEO. Not a significant insider holding (~3x annual salary). Vanilla shareholder letter.

Investment thesis: 10% dividend. 10% growth. Low debt. No share dilution. Investing in growing the business.

Remuneration: Financial performance measures (profit before tax, earnings per share (EPS) and total shareholder return (TSR)) are used as the key performance indicators (KPIs). The combination of EPS and TSR performance conditions provides a balance between rewarding management for growth in sustainable profitability and stock market outperformance. TSR is a clear indicator of the relative success of the Group in delivering shareholder value and, as a performance measure, firmly aligns the interests of Directors and shareholders. The EPS target range will require growth from the current all-time high level of profitability and the TSR condition will be based on recent share price performance. Performance against EPS and TSR targets are reviewed by the Committee

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Cullen/Frost Bankers (CFR)

I recently started a position 50 share position in CFR @$44. I see this as a very long term investment and will continue to build the position if the price goes south of $42.

Management

The management at CFR is very stable. They believe in promoting people from the inside.

Phil Green, who has been with Frost for 35 years and has served as chief financial officer since 1995, is now president of Cullen/Frost, with greater responsibility for and involvement in all areas of the company. Jerry Salinas, who has served as treasurer for 18 years, is now chief financial officer. Paul Bracher, who has been with Frost since 1981, is our chief banking officer, with responsibility for, and as a steward of, our banking operations. And Bill Perotti who, in his 34 years with Frost, has been responsible for both credit and risk, is focusing more time as chief risk officer. – AR 2014

The average tenure with the Company of the five Named Executive Officers included in this proxy statement is in excess of 35 years. – Proxy 2014

Also, the management has significant skin-in-the-game.

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The CEO gets paid according to the net income of the company (traditionally capped at 0.8% of net income). But, it has been generally around 100% of his base salary. The performance measure for the CEO is very qualitative. Frankly, I don’t know how they actually arrive at anything reasonable.

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The primary criterion for annual incentive payments for the Named Executive Officers (other than the Chief Executive Officer) is the measurement of financial performance vs. budgeted net income for Cullen/Frost.

Valuation

The business has done quite well over the years. Here is the balance sheet data from 2010 to 2014 (right to left).

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The growth in deposits have been 10% for the last 5 years !

Frost Bank received the highest ranking in customer satisfaction in Texas in the J.D. Power and Associates 2014 U.S. Retail Banking Satisfaction StudySM for the fifth consecutive year.

At the current price, the company is paying 5% in dividend. So, at current prices, I am looking at a return of > 12%.

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The earning per share on the other hand, has only grown at 4.4% a year during the same time period (2010-2014). This has been happening because of the fed rate being so low.

The Corporation is primarily funded by core deposits, with non-interest-bearing demand deposits historically being a significant source of funds. This lower-cost funding base is expected to have a positive impact on the Corporation’s net interest income and net interest margin in a rising interest rate environment. The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Dodd-Frank Act”) repealed the federal prohibition on the payment of interest on demand deposits, thereby permitting depository institutions to pay interest on business transaction and other accounts beginning July 21, 2011. To date, the Corporation has not experienced any significant additional interest costs as a result of the repeal; however, the Corporation may begin to incur interest costs associated with certain demand deposits in the future as market conditions warrant.

So, if the Dodd-Frank Act does not ruin the advantage completely, the earnings of CFR will increase nicely in a higher interest environment.

The Corporation’s balance sheet has historically been asset sensitive, meaning that earning assets generally reprice more quickly than interest-bearing liabilities. Therefore, the Corporation’s net interest margin was likely to increase in sustained periods of rising interest rates and decrease in sustained periods of declining interest rates. In an effort to make the Corporation’s balance sheet less sensitive to changes in interest rates, the Corporation entered into various interest rate swaps which effectively converted certain variable-rate loans into fixed rate instruments for a period of seven years.

Second Level Thinking

Why is the company cheap ? The recent drop in oil prices has scared the investors. This is a Texas bank and CFR itself says that they have exposure to oil companies.

Outstanding loans in the energy sector represent about 16 percent of our loan portfolio. That means that 84 percent of our loans are in other sectors, so our portfolio is very well diversified.